Friday, April 17

10E2654: In Praise Of Knit Ties - Fridays Are Tie Days

 Photo by Alan Clarke via Esquire.

Above from 2010 article on the archetypes of menswear (link) - The Trad (as opposed to The Sport, The Rake, The Outsdoorsman, etc) still one of the best done bits.  The angry, about to explode New England academic. Hello pot this is the kettle haha...
Signature accessory: Knit tie.
Bragging rights:
Wearing the same pair of khakis for fifteen years.
As knit ties are - you guessed it - 'knit' rather than cut from cloth - they have a straight profile down the front so are generally slim. They end almost universally in a straight edge rather than a point (grenadine ties are a different tightly woven type of tie that often end in a point - also great). Why the love? The crumbly, rough texture of the knit takes the wearer into high/lo territory - dressed up but not as 'the defendant'...    Signals you have so many ties you even have KNIT ties...






Knit ties have a slimmer section round the neckband, that means you can successfully tie a knot without a lot of bulk. Four in hand (schoolboy knot) the only option due to the heft. Anyway... Windsor knots are characteristic of SMERSH.  David Muir over at ABC News wears navy, polka dot, shantung silk versions... Pretty unique choices for mainstream tv, nailing it.






Thursday, April 16

10E2653: Rent A Flat Above A Shop


It was April 16, 19NinteySomething... The 'New Town' Edinburgh (built in the late 1700s).  Shallow Grave territory (great intro - ends by that church at botom).  We lived top floor, no lift,  high above the shop Margiotas (a fancyish corner shop chain).  GoogleMaps tells me it is now a yoga studio.Also a sweet sweet Defender w camper roof parked by the Mini... check it!

PULP's Common People (release a few years before all this) is somehow an absolute earworm right now in the kitchen. You don't know this one?? Go on... big coffee and turn it up. "I'll see what I can do..."



Monday, April 6

10E2652: Kerchief


kerchief



Etymology; Middle English kerchef, from Old French couvrechief, from couvrir (“to cover”) and chief/chef (“head”).

via